Voyant – Sonnet 113

In Shakespeare’s Sonnet 113, there is repetitive references to ones mind. Highlighted in Voyant, Shakespeare uses the word “mind” to repeatedly express the hinderances he has felt since leaving his beloved. Highlighting “mind” allowed me to understand the importance of how his inner struggle has effected his perceptions of the outer world. Shakespeare also as shown below, uses the word “mind” once at the begging, middle, and as well as the end. This enhances the importance of such word as it progresses throughout the entire sonnet.

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Although Shakespeare makes numerous references towards his sight and its relation to his mind, Voyant only draws on exact word repetitions. This caused somewhat of a hinderance to my analysis, as Volant does not draw on similar words, only ones that are completely the same. When Shakespeare writes “For if it see the rudest or gentlest sight,” the words do not come up in relation to “eye” due to the fact they are not the exact word. This created some discrepancies when using Voyant, as is does not show all relative or related words.

Shakespeare makes constant references to the disconnection his sight and mind;  “mine eye is in my mind,”, exemplifying that since he left, his eye is not reflecting that of which he is really seeing, but that of which his mind wants him to see. He also instates “Nor his own vision holds what it doth catch :”, once again exemplifying how his vision is disconnected from that is which he is really seeing.

 

Voyant

One issue I found when using Voyant to analyze my text was the highlighting of the words such as “the” or “it”. Although there are quite a few repetitions of these words, they prescribe no relevance to major themes or symbols within a piece. Screen Shot 2015-02-24 at 2.26.01 PM

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