Category Archives: Genre

Shakespeare Quarterly – Sonnets

(Arguments badge – article thesis)

Turning Sonnets into Poems: Textual Affect and John Benson’s Metaphysical Shakespeare.

muse.jhu.edu/journals/shakespeare_quarterly/v064/64.1.heffernan.html

In Turning Sonnets, Megan Heffernan questions the arrangements and classification of sonnets through the analysis of textual features including genres, thematics and form. It proves to be a deeply interesting read, highlighting the history of cataloguing sources and modes, to effectively name (or in Shakespeare’s case) number sonnets.

April 9, Tutorial Follow-up

(Facetime Badge) April 9, 2015

Today’s tutorial left me with lots of new considerations regarding Shakespeare’s interpretation of beauty and sin, particularly through his ability to create the exterior attractiveness and intoxication of sin.  The imagery of virtue removed and falseness revealed reminded me of Edgar Allen Poe’s, Imp of the Perverse- the urge to sin just for the sole purpose of doing so.  Placing one’s carnal desires and actions on another is a very common element in Shakespeare’s sonnets (often towards women) but ultimately because the sonnet is a more personal slice of writing, the ownership of lust ultimately reflects back onto the speaker. It unites and blends the lines of gender as we are all ultimately vulnerable to jealously, deceit, longing and loneliness.  Many consider beauty and sin to be opposing forces, however each contains identical emotions and reactions, as Shakespeare brilliantly demonstrates, they truly are one of the same.

Open Links to Performances (Performance Badge)

As You Like It – 1936 film version

Helpful version as it contains subtitles for retention and comprehension of material not covered in class. A great comedy to pair with Twelfth Night, and resourceful for unpacking themes within the pastoral mode.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=wFChichBoPl

To Kill Myself – Rape of Lucrece 

Wonderfully artistic visioning from The Royal Shakespeare Company.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vd2ddYAUIY

Act 3, Scene 2 – The Winter’s Tale 

Perhaps for me the standout example of a well spoken, educated, strong woman in all the texts covered this semester. A great reminder of our lectures covering the power and importance of words.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vm7beWekpa8

Romeo and Juliet – Onscreen footage

Everyone’s classic introduction to Shakespeare. I was reminded heavily of the play when reading The genres of Shakespeare’s plays, by Susan Snyder as she talks in depth about the reflection of youth in Shakespeare’s works. Characters become representations of the time period and a refection of society. This is set up immediately  in Romeo and Juliet’s prologue, “Two households, both alike in dignity|In fair Verona, where we lay our scene|From ancient grudge break to new mutiny,|where civil blood makes civil hands unclean” (1.Pro.1-3).

www.youtube.com/watch?v=FHoaPLO6zd8

Act 5, Scene 3 – King Lear 

Continuing the consideration of genre, King Lear is a great example of ego and pride leading to a tragic end (which cannot be evaded). This is a very emotionally powerful clip displaying the effects of time within a tragedy.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=_MpGb0nJ3eM

 

 

Visual Art: Troilus, the Brave

This visual art is symbolic of how Troilus finds himself to be torn in act one; he is expected to maintain his strong and stable composure as a soldier, but on the inside, his desperate love for Cressida tears him apart.
This visual art is symbolic of how Troilus finds himself to be torn in act one; he is expected to maintain his strong and stable composure as a soldier, but on the inside, his desperate love for Cressida tears him apart.

The image of Troilus on the left is symbolic of the archetypical soldier that he is expected to be. The armour symbolizes strength, order, conformity, and illusion. The image of Troilus on the right, dressed in darker clothing to symbolize his woe, depicts the way he really feels while he is forced to wage war instead of profess his love to Cressida. His lack of armour represents the vulnerability that is a natural product of such intense emotions.

Visual Art: Cressida Fair

This visual art represents the idealistic way that Troilus thinks of Cressida before he learns of her infidelity. He worships her fair complexion, her cheeks, her lips, her face... He dreams only of her, and sees not her flaws.
This visual art represents the idealistic way that Troilus thinks of Cressida before he learns of her infidelity. He worships her fair complexion, her cheeks, her lips, her face… He dreams only of her, and sees not her flaws.

I chose to draw Cressida in a cloud to represent the way that she falls short of Troilus’ daydreams in real life. She is only so fair and pure to him since love is clouding his vision.

Movie Poster: Troilus and Cressida

My theatrical poster for Troilus and Cressida, in keeping with both the play's tragic genre and the two main plots (the romance and the war).
My theatrical poster for Troilus and Cressida, in keeping with both the play’s tragic genre and the two main plots (the romance and the war).

The rose is symbolic of the (failed) love between Troilus and Cressida, and the sword is symbolic of the Trojan War in which the story takes place. I chose red and black as accent colours: red for the rage, the blood, and the passionate love, and black for the death and suffering that occurs.

Sonnet #2: A Daughter’s Loss

Thieved prior to his hour, by false friends
These gods lacked mercy, as they heard my cries
I hold his still young hand before his ends
He who begot me, strong, pious and wise

From whose secure arms will I be given?
When the wedding bells come for me
To steal my blessings tis not forgiven
As every glance will yearn for thee

The universe had no solicitude
To spare me this much anguish and despair
The enemies hidden in solitude
Yet I bequeath my father in their care

With my patriarch burns my piety
As the perished man is my deity

Sonnet #1: Lustful Eyes

I knew at my first unfortunate glace
He was blazing within his own desires
Fierce and scorching, giving pity no chance
And I too frail to extinguish such a fire

Black shadows of dishonour and disgrace
Did overcast the pure light in my name
The darkness painted colours on my face
Staining me black with his immoral aim

Foul intentions often dim the eyes
And inevitable darkness follows,
Where all things true and pure begin demise
Hence the strength of such profanity grows

I stand untouched, yet adulterated
As the lecherous eyes leave me tainted

Theatrical Poster for Twelfth Night

Here is my movie poster for Twelfth Night:

shes_the_man_ver2

Haha, just kidding. How often is that joke used in our #engl205 class, eh?

Here is my actual movie poster (the proof is the poor camera quality):

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Sorry that it’s sideways, I tried to fix it but alas, I am not tech-savvy. Please rotate your head 90 degrees

Forgive-me-GIF

 

 

This is an imaginary theatrical poster for Twelfth Night. The two faces depicted are the twins Viola and Sebastian. Their faces are separated by a arrow (like Cupid’s love arrow). Also, the end of the arrow is a triangle with a heart in it to represent the love triangle between Viola/Cesario, Olivia, and Orsino. There’s a mask in the upper right corner (if the picture was rotated the proper way) that represents the important thematic element of disguises. Lastly, the symbol on the right side is the male and female gender symbol, with a red question mark going through it to depict the gender ambiguity in the play.