Category Archives: Comedy

Open Links to Performances (Performance Badge)

As You Like It – 1936 film version

Helpful version as it contains subtitles for retention and comprehension of material not covered in class. A great comedy to pair with Twelfth Night, and resourceful for unpacking themes within the pastoral mode.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=wFChichBoPl

To Kill Myself – Rape of Lucrece 

Wonderfully artistic visioning from The Royal Shakespeare Company.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vd2ddYAUIY

Act 3, Scene 2 – The Winter’s Tale 

Perhaps for me the standout example of a well spoken, educated, strong woman in all the texts covered this semester. A great reminder of our lectures covering the power and importance of words.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vm7beWekpa8

Romeo and Juliet – Onscreen footage

Everyone’s classic introduction to Shakespeare. I was reminded heavily of the play when reading The genres of Shakespeare’s plays, by Susan Snyder as she talks in depth about the reflection of youth in Shakespeare’s works. Characters become representations of the time period and a refection of society. This is set up immediately  in Romeo and Juliet’s prologue, “Two households, both alike in dignity|In fair Verona, where we lay our scene|From ancient grudge break to new mutiny,|where civil blood makes civil hands unclean” (1.Pro.1-3).

www.youtube.com/watch?v=FHoaPLO6zd8

Act 5, Scene 3 – King Lear 

Continuing the consideration of genre, King Lear is a great example of ego and pride leading to a tragic end (which cannot be evaded). This is a very emotionally powerful clip displaying the effects of time within a tragedy.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=_MpGb0nJ3eM

 

 

Theatrical Poster for Twelfth Night

Here is my movie poster for Twelfth Night:

shes_the_man_ver2

Haha, just kidding. How often is that joke used in our #engl205 class, eh?

Here is my actual movie poster (the proof is the poor camera quality):

20150406_211419

 

 

Sorry that it’s sideways, I tried to fix it but alas, I am not tech-savvy. Please rotate your head 90 degrees

Forgive-me-GIF

 

 

This is an imaginary theatrical poster for Twelfth Night. The two faces depicted are the twins Viola and Sebastian. Their faces are separated by a arrow (like Cupid’s love arrow). Also, the end of the arrow is a triangle with a heart in it to represent the love triangle between Viola/Cesario, Olivia, and Orsino. There’s a mask in the upper right corner (if the picture was rotated the proper way) that represents the important thematic element of disguises. Lastly, the symbol on the right side is the male and female gender symbol, with a red question mark going through it to depict the gender ambiguity in the play.

Writing Badge: Reshuffle (New Scene Created)

 

This scene is based loosely off of King John II of Cyprus who had an illegitimate child named James. In this scene, King John meets a soldier who is said to be the most heroic in all the land. It was rumoured that this soldier (James) looked and behaved like King John. James is unaware of the circumstances. He is invited to a feast at the castle where King John, upon seeing his son becomes very nervous. He sees a resemblance so strong that he becomes convinced that this is his son— Carlos and Orsino (the villains of this story) also know that James is indeed the son of the king. They do not want James to become the heir to the throne in hopes that King John’s legitimate daughter Charlotte (not in this scene) will become Queen and grant them each a great fortune.

 

 I could not properly format it on here so I included pictures of my word document with references to each play colour coded and the Act, Scene and Line Numbers of each line used in the shuffle.

 

Fathima Nazir (10138034)#1

#2

#3

 

(Fathima) Sadiya Nazir (10138034)

 

Visual Memory – King Lear Part 2

The level of enjoyment I am deriving from drawing these might be considered concerning.

Everyone knows that a letter you find on the floor is conclusive proof of any and all plots of treason
Everyone knows that a letter you find on the floor is conclusive proof of any and all plots of treason
Miscommunication 101
Miscommunication 101
Edmund is so pleased with himself.
Edmund is so pleased with himself.
Goneril is the queen of believable excuses.
Goneril is the queen of believable excuses.
Sylvester McCoy arrives with advice
Sylvester McCoy arrives with advice and comic relief
Kent joins Lear's court. Again.
Kent joins Lear’s court. Again.
Kent kicks Oswald around like a football.
Kent kicks Oswald around like a football.
Lear and Goneril are both 100% done. Albany is confused.
Lear and Goneril are both 100% done. Albany is confused.

Visual Memory – King Lear Part 1

So I was bored during Spanish.  Desperately bored.  I suck at languages (unless, of course, it’s from Middle Earth), and when I get bored-slash-feel hopelessly inadequate, I doodle.  A lot.  Today, my pen chose King Lear.  So I started drawing little comic strips to help me remember major plot points and situations I found amusing.  I thought maybe I could go for some badge points, and I’m going to try to get through the whole play.  Ready for some silly, weirdly drawn comics? Let’s do this!

Timing, Gloucester. Timing.
Timing, Gloucester. Timing.
Lear is not quite in his right mind...
Lear is not quite in his right mind… Wrong movie, Dad.
You've gotta not be twisted if you want to walk with the Queen.
You cannot be twisted if you want to walk with the Queen. Also, France is the real winner here.
The sisterly love is overwhelming
The sisterly love is overwhelming

So there you have it… The first part of King Lear in… what? Ten seconds? Maybe I’ll try to finish up the rest of the play… I will always prioritize Shakespeare over Spanish. 😉

Reading Week: The Sonnet

To study texts in solitude,

births tears anew in morning’s wake.

Since work doth not improve my mood,

I think I’d rather eat this cake.

 

To check my grades on d2L

would surely break my spirit strong.

My sober clicks land me in hell;

my study habits have been wrong.

 

And so, I promise to myself

My time shall not be turn’d to waste.

My head, it slams against against my shelf

I scold myself: “I must make haste!”

 

Though, three more tranquil days of freedom do, somewhat, console me;

for my green-eyed friends, but two remain—I’m smirking at their jealousy.