Category Archives: Plays

Visual Art: Troilus, the Brave

This visual art is symbolic of how Troilus finds himself to be torn in act one; he is expected to maintain his strong and stable composure as a soldier, but on the inside, his desperate love for Cressida tears him apart.
This visual art is symbolic of how Troilus finds himself to be torn in act one; he is expected to maintain his strong and stable composure as a soldier, but on the inside, his desperate love for Cressida tears him apart.

The image of Troilus on the left is symbolic of the archetypical soldier that he is expected to be. The armour symbolizes strength, order, conformity, and illusion. The image of Troilus on the right, dressed in darker clothing to symbolize his woe, depicts the way he really feels while he is forced to wage war instead of profess his love to Cressida. His lack of armour represents the vulnerability that is a natural product of such intense emotions.

Visual Art: Cressida Fair

This visual art represents the idealistic way that Troilus thinks of Cressida before he learns of her infidelity. He worships her fair complexion, her cheeks, her lips, her face... He dreams only of her, and sees not her flaws.
This visual art represents the idealistic way that Troilus thinks of Cressida before he learns of her infidelity. He worships her fair complexion, her cheeks, her lips, her face… He dreams only of her, and sees not her flaws.

I chose to draw Cressida in a cloud to represent the way that she falls short of Troilus’ daydreams in real life. She is only so fair and pure to him since love is clouding his vision.

Movie Poster: Troilus and Cressida

My theatrical poster for Troilus and Cressida, in keeping with both the play's tragic genre and the two main plots (the romance and the war).
My theatrical poster for Troilus and Cressida, in keeping with both the play’s tragic genre and the two main plots (the romance and the war).

The rose is symbolic of the (failed) love between Troilus and Cressida, and the sword is symbolic of the Trojan War in which the story takes place. I chose red and black as accent colours: red for the rage, the blood, and the passionate love, and black for the death and suffering that occurs.

General Discussion on Troilus and Cressida

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I am going to discuss Troilus and Cressida

First I would like to discuss some of the parts of Troilus and Cressida that I find confusing and why. It might be due to the fact that I do not understand the background story of the Trojan and Greek war that is the setting of this play, but some parts I just do not understand.

 

You said I could insert gifs, so I’ve ran with that

 

One aspect that I find really confusing is the fact that it did not take much persuading to make Troilus allow the love-of-his-life Cressida to leave to the enemies’ encampment. If he loved her so much, why would he just let her leave into the hands of his enemies? Just so they could have a war official back who did not help them win the war in the end anyway (spoiler alert). Even if Antenor did help them defeat the Greek army, if I have learned anything from Shakespeare is that you are supposed to do anything to get the girl. Even if that may cause your death (i.e. Tarquin), or cause you to suffer in prison (i.e. Malvolio). Get with the program, Troilus.

Along with that, Troilus was frantic that Cressida would not be faithful, despite her protests. Was that based on her previous behaviour that was explained by Shakespeare? Was their some background information that explained that Cressida was a flirtatious and fickle woman? Or was this just misogynistic behaviour, where the male was assuming that the woman was not going to be faithful for the sole fact that she is a female. Whatever it was, it was definite foreshadowing since that’s exactly what Cressida ended up doing.

Cressida who seemingly left the Trojans quite distressed moved on very fast. Was it because she thought that her life in Troy was completely over? Or was her heart really as fickle as Troilus feared?  I wonder how different directors would adapt the scene where Cressida is being kissed by the Grecian officials when she gets there – would she be in tears? Since later on she does end up with one of them (Diomedes), so was she really all that devastated to be torn away from her home and lover?

The thing that bothered me the most, besides the Cressida and Troilus love disaster, was that the Greeks and the Trojans were downright friendly when they would go to each others’ camps. Like, hullo, are we the only ones that remember that you are at war with these people?! They have killed your comrades and now you are behaving all chummy with them. Other than a few of them who were trying to kill each other on the sidelines, specifically Ajax and Hector, the rest of them were not as hostile as I expected them to me.

Eomer does not approve

 

These were just some of the questions/problems I had whilst reading Troilus and Cressida.

Visual Art

The following  visual art is for my favourite line from all the plays:

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[Exit, pursued by a bear]

I don’t know if that’s cheating because it doesn’t really count as a line – it’s more of a stage direction. Even though that situation was dire (i.e. the death of Antigonus), I still found that part hilarious. As you can see by my depiction of the bear as Winnie the Pooh. Yeah, I’ll see myself out. . . (hopefully also pursued by a bear).

Okay, I’m done for real this time

Theatrical Poster for Twelfth Night

Here is my movie poster for Twelfth Night:

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Haha, just kidding. How often is that joke used in our #engl205 class, eh?

Here is my actual movie poster (the proof is the poor camera quality):

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Sorry that it’s sideways, I tried to fix it but alas, I am not tech-savvy. Please rotate your head 90 degrees

Forgive-me-GIF

 

 

This is an imaginary theatrical poster for Twelfth Night. The two faces depicted are the twins Viola and Sebastian. Their faces are separated by a arrow (like Cupid’s love arrow). Also, the end of the arrow is a triangle with a heart in it to represent the love triangle between Viola/Cesario, Olivia, and Orsino. There’s a mask in the upper right corner (if the picture was rotated the proper way) that represents the important thematic element of disguises. Lastly, the symbol on the right side is the male and female gender symbol, with a red question mark going through it to depict the gender ambiguity in the play.